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More than 100 neglected, sick dogs and a pig found at animal ‘sanctuary’

Pets Talk of the Town

A bleeding basset hound.A labrador unable to stand.A boerboel with deformed legs.This is what the SPCA discovered at a house serving as a “shelter” to more than 100 dogs, many of them neglected and ill, at Odendaalsrus in Welkom.
'A bleeding basset hound.A labrador unable to stand.A boerboel with deformed legs.The dogs were kept in an outside building ‘mangy and neglected’. Image: SPCA This is what the SPCA discovered at a house serving as a “shelter” to more than 100 dogs, many of them neglected and ill, at Odendaalsrus in Welkom.Free State SPCA inspector Thea Smit said the organisation had received an anonymous tip-off about a large number of dogs being kept at the house operating as a non-profit organisation.They were “met with dogs fighting for attention” and biting each other in excitement upon their arrival on Tuesday.She said the dogs, kept in an outside building, had mange and appeared to be neglected.Inspectors from Virginia and Bloemfontein found a bleeding basset hound which they suspected had not been treated for weeks. “He was unable to move due to the severity of abscesses that must have caused unbearable pain and discomfort.” An old labrador lay in a corner on cement, unable to stand due to what appeared to be arthritis. “He attempted to get up, but kept falling down,” she said. “Dogs were scratching from a skin condition and most of them had visible ear problems, with swollen and infected ears,” she added.A big boerboel had deformed legs and growths on his body.Smit said they found more animals in different sections of the property. “A pig, with no enrichment or proper hygienic conditions, was fighting off dogs that attempted to eat his faeces as he defecated. “It was disturbing and upsetting to witness this scene,” she said.Smit said the owner informed them she had received funds from the public to run an non-profit organisation. “Some of the animals were in a terrible state, with external parasites and others aggressive and not socialised,” she said.Many of the dogs had to be put down due to severe illness.Social workers were also brought in to speak to the owner.A case of animal cruelty was opened. “We cannot allow people to let animals suffer to ease their own conscience.We urge the public to make informed decisions when they spend their generous, hard-earned money on private shelters that promote a so-called ‘no kill’ policy,” said Smit. . The post More than 100 neglected, sick dogs and a pig found at animal ‘sanctuary’ appeared first on Talk of the Town .'

Noordhoek launches compost bins for dog waste

Pets CapeTown ETC

Following successful trials in Scarborough, Noordhoek will be launches new composting dog poo bins at the beach to ensure pet waste is managed responsibly, in an environmentally-friendly.
'Following successful trials in Scarborough, Noordhoek will be launches new composting dog poo bins at the beach to ensure pet waste is managed responsibly, in an environmentally-friendly.For years there have been different opinions of what should be done with dog waste on beaches – be it simply throwing it into the bushes or putting it in plastic bags and binning it, from there it will go to landfills somewhere in Cape Town.After much deliberation and consideration by the community, this new solution will allow animal owners to responsibly dispose of their pet’s waste, without using plastic or leaving the faeces behind to despoil the natural landscape.What the new bins will look like.Scarborough has tested the composting bins on its beaches for roughly a year, and the over one ton of dog faeces have been processed in them and turned into valuable soil nutrients.Two of the bins will be available for dog-owning visitors to Noordhoek beach as well as one bin at the common area.The bins are complete with faeces-digesting worms and are the best possible way to dispose of dog poo.At each bin will be 100% compostable bags available for depositing the poo.These bags are easily digested by the worms and usually disappear within two to three weeks.Keep an eye out for these bins the next time you’re in Noordhoek.The community is still looking for local business sponsors to help cover the costs of these eco-friendly alternative bags.The bins also come with tools and utensils such as wooden paddles and recycled bottles that locals can use to scoop up the poo.This new offering is an amazing solution to pollution on local beaches and a much more eco-friendly method of dog poo disposal.Those visiting Noordhoek are being asked to respect the new bins and only throw dog poo in them.Picture: Pexels/ Gaia Scarborough . The post Noordhoek launches compost bins for dog waste appeared first on CapeTown ETC .'

Brace yourself for a possible distemper outbreak

Pets CapeTown ETC

Veterinarians are warning of a life-threatening epidemic that could mean the deaths of many dogs as four recent cases of distemper have been reported in the last 48 hours in the Nelson Mandela Bay area.
'Veterinarians are warning of a life-threatening epidemic that could mean the deaths of many dogs as four recent cases of distemper have been reported in the last 48 hours in the Nelson Mandela Bay area.Many are concerned the virus could easily spread through the Western Cape and a number of vets and animal care associations are bracing themselves for a possible spike in arrivals.Allan Perrins from the Animal Welfare Society says, “Cases of distemper are usually related to the weather and although we have not noticed a spike in the number of distemper cases at this point, we are bracing ourselves for an increase in cases because of the weather.” Last year distemper made its way into Cape Town in June and reports of infected dogs were on the rise in late winter as well.These recent reports follow two other cases of distemper as well as several cases of parvovirus reported roughly two weeks ago. “Currently we receive roughly five cases a week where dogs are displaying signs of distemper, often owners do not have the funds to afford a test for the virus and in this case we treat the animal with the appropriate antibiotics but this is all one can do.Otherwise we suggest humane euthanasia as there is no cure for distemper,” says Perrins.Both viruses in question are highly contagious and rural areas are the most severely affected.This year alone hundreds of dogs in rural areas have already died from these dreaded afflictions.These viruses do not only affect dogs, but are able to transfer to humans as well.Dogs which have not been vaccinated and come into contact with other infected animals are at a high risk of contracting the disease.Locals are urged to ensure their dog is vaccinated and be cautious of allowing them to mingle with other unknown dogs.Pet owners who cannot afford to pay for the vaccination may get them done for free.Symptoms of canine distemper include: – Diarrhea – Continued fever – Pneumonia (characterised by laboured breathing and coughing) – Depletion of white blood cells – Vomiting – Hardening of the pads of the feet – Unusual tooth enamel – Depression – Ataxia, an inability to coordinate the muscles – Hyperesthesia, a heightened sensitivity to sensory stimuli, like touch and pain – Myoclonus, disabling muscle spasms – Paralysis, partial or complete – Deterioration of mental abilities and motor skills – Seizures affecting any part of the body.One type of head seizure that is unique to distemper is sometimes called “the chewing gum fit” About distemper:  Canine distemper is commonly seen in young puppies between three and six months of age, but can occasionally be found in younger or older pets.While it is primarily a disease of dogs, it can also be seen in other animals, such ferrets, coyotes, foxes, raccoons, and skunks, and is spread through contact with the bodily fluids of the infected animal.Distemper attacks all organ systems, including the respiratory system, and ends up in the brain, while parvovirus causes acute vomiting and bloody diarrhoea, leading to toxic shock and death.Picture: Pexels . The post Brace yourself for a possible distemper outbreak appeared first on CapeTown ETC .'

Watch: How to make a Pallet Dog Bed like SuzelleDIY [video]

Pets The South African

If you’re dog-lover and a do-it-yourselfer, this is definitely for you! Watch SuzelleDIY demonstrate how to make a dog bed out of Pallets.
'South Africa’s favourite DIY specialist, SuzelleDIY recently wanted to make something special for Bakkies (her and her best friend Marianne’s dog) – especially something that is cuddly and offers cover. So, what better idea than an upcycled doggy bed fit for a king?! This is a special project for dog-lovers out there. To make a Pallet Dog Bed like Suzelle, you will need: A Pallet Some pieces of wood A jigsaw Sander Wood screws Your drill Scissors A cuddly blanket And finally, two pillows! Watch the rest of the web episode down here to see exactly how you can make a dog bed out of Pallets: Earlier in her career, Suzelle showed us how to make a dog bed out of a simple jersey (in the episode she used Marianne’s old polo neck jersey because ‘peach’ isn’t her colour, so go ahead and throw out those old jerseys of yours as well and put them to good use!) For the dog bed, you’ll need an old jersey, scissors, wool, ‘a nice’ big needle and finally some stuffing and a pillow. You’ll then continue to sew and sew (Suzelle can even do it with her eyes closed!) Also watch :  SuzelleDIY’s best pet hacks for all the pet lovers out there Also read:  Suzelle and Marianne’s boyfriend shows us how to make an organisation station There’s it! In an older bite-size episode, Suzelle shows us how to slice a watermelon for easy-eating and without having to deal with sticky fingers. She also shows us how to make watermelon  lollies , how to make fancy cocktail decorations and finally how to make a fancy drink….all with the use of watermelons in some way. Also read: SuzelleDIY’s egg-hacks that can make any winter morning better'